info@digitalmedialabs.org

Hull 2010

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Our first week long Digital Media Lab took place in October 2010 and was a frantic experience. Many artists positively showed contempt for touchscreens by the time we reached the half way point, through works such as ‘How Clean is Your Mouse?’ by Bob Levene and Ellie Harrison who created dirty cooker hobs that you could rub the dirt off, but just when you think you have cleaned the last bit off, it’s dirty again.

The intention was to give the artists 7 days hands on research and development with the support of professional technologists leading to interim exhibition showcasing the results of the lab. The artists were supported by the lab team and technologist, lecturer, artist – Ben Dalton.  In addition we had Pete Eyres run a one day workshop on arts and business as sustainable practice.

Commissions

The culmination of the Lab gave the opportunity for the artists to present and discuss their findings. Following the presentation of works the participating ten artists, and only these artists, were presented with the commission brief for a site-specific touch screen artwork.  It is key to the philosophy of Digital Media Labs that for the presentation of the commission brief was not presented to participants till a period of experimentation on the lab had taken place.  The aim of the commissions was to create something which generates a positive atmosphere within the centre; fills time and provides a distraction for those waiting to be seen; easy to use, playful and engaging-inclusive art that is accessible and enjoyable to use.
Poke

Poke

Poke is an interactive artwork that allows the viewer to physically engage with a natural human reflex, through the act of poking. Referencing the relationship between touching and feeling, the…

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Magnets

Magnets

MAGNETS by Lawrence Molloy is a digital kinetic sculpture that uses evolving magnetic forces to make a playground from multicoloured rectangles. You can build and destroy shapes against a time limit of ever changing polarities. lawrences Proposal A visitor enters…

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POKETOPIA

POKETOPIA

POKETOPIA by Ellie Weir is a view into three playful realities; a girl who follows your finger, a boy and girl who you bring together by touch but always run away and an adorable cat…

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 Lab Book

Read more in the lab book from 2010

If for some reason, you can’t see our book, then please download it here

Nominators

Artists

Read more on the artists journey on the archived lab site: Archive Hull 2010

Victoria Lucas
Victoria Lucas

“Victoria Lucas’ art practice comprises video, installation and sound. She explores the transient nature of…

Stuart Childs
Stuart Childs

I like things with wires. Taking / breaking apart, fiddling and tinkering, I’m fascinated by…

Ross Dalziel
Ross Dalziel

  I make artwork responding to technological and social spaces often trying to setup a…

Michael Day
Michael Day

“My practice is interdisciplinary and uses a wide range of media and technologies, including digital…

Lawrence Molloy
Lawrence Molloy

I am a visual artist who utilises the absurd in order to engage audiences in…

John O’Shea
John O’Shea

I’m an artist and co-director Re-Dock (www.re-dock.org) who are a collective of artists working collaboratively…

Ellie Harrison
Ellie Harrison

I am an artist based in Glasgow. I have just graduated from the Master of…

Ellie Weir
Ellie Weir

Hello, I’m Ellie Weir, born the tail end of 1979,  in suburban London. I came…

David Priestman
David Priestman

My work has essentially taken two forms: filmmaking and installation. My films are short experimental…

Bob Levene
Bob Levene

I keep trying to make sense of things by adopting pseudo-scientific strategies and anthropological methods…

Sponsors 2010

Funders 2010

Why DMLabs?

Today’s professional artists and makers have little time to research and develop new ideas and processes. Typically working on several projects at any one time, freelancers often find themselves having to fall back on their existing ideas to fulfill the demands of modern commissions and residencies, many of which leave little time and budget for original research and experimentation.

From our own experience in managing and creating public art, we felt that artists can easily become overly reliant on what they already know when working on a commission without dedicated research and development time, often to the detriment of their own creative and professional development.

‘Artists sometimes tie themselves in knots. Digital Media Labs was the most fun way imaginable to untie some of those knots.’

Neil Winterburn, participant in Digital Media Labs 2014

This is where Digital Media Labs comes in. We invite practitioners from across a range of disciplines to develop new skills and prototype works in a dedicated environment in order to advance their practice along new lines. Part of our approach at Digital Media Labs is simply about removing the everyday obstacles that sit between focused creativity, multi-media play and new creative works. We primarily work with practitioners specialising in visual arts, sound and moving image but participants have also included makers, musicians and animators.

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